A motorcycle man is often considered to be outlaw biker. Why this is, remains to be one of the great mysteries of life I guess. When you consider that out law bikers make up only one percent of the total motorcycle men the ride. This is self evident by the exclusive patch that outlaw bikers wear. It is called the 1% patch and is worn only by the few that choose to live a life style contrary to what some would call the norm.

This is why I feel there is some how a great mystery afoot. If only one percent of the men that ride are outlaw in nature, then that leaves ninety nine percent of the men that ride on the side of the law, or we would presume they are any way. Read more

I have been among the ranks of motorcycle men riding motorcycles for over forty years. I got my first mini bike when I was twelve years old, I have had and ridden motorcycles ever since. I guess that qualifies me in the group of motorcycle men, a biker in one sense or another. Although I have never prospected or been patched into an outlaw motorcycle gang, I have ridden with many. I was the very image of the lone outlaw biker.

Growing up in the late 60’s I was a child of the drug culture. I started taking drugs’ at the age of eleven, one year before I started riding a motorcycle. I was a lost child. I stopped caring about home, school and just about anything else except biking and drugs.

By the age of 14 I had gotten into trouble and was emancipated by the court. I was given an option, that on the day I turned seventeen I had to volunteer into the armed forces or go to jail as an adult. I choose to join the army.

The military was not the best place for a drug addict such as myself. It was the worst. There were more drugs to be had in the army then in the outside world.

While I was in the Army in Germany I bought a new motorcycle. It was a sweet bi-centennial Harley Davidson Sportster 1000. Even though it was made by AMF, at the time it was sweet. I spent most of my time in the service getting high and riding my motorcycle all over Europe.

I got out of the Army had my bike shipped home and came back state side. Being home, free and mobile I started right where I had left off, drinking, drugging, and raising hell. Read more